Previous Events

Date

Saving America's Cities: The Past, Present, and Future of Urban Revitalization

Date: Thursday, February 27, 2020
Can past efforts to revitalize America’s cities inform contemporary strategies to address the problems of economic inequality, unaffordable housing, segregated neighborhoods, and deteriorating infrastructure? That question, in part, informs Saving America’s Cities: Ed Logue and the Struggle to Renew Urban America in the Suburban Age, a new book by Lizabeth Cohen, a Professor in the History Department at Harvard and former Dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

Architecture as a “Learning” Living Machine: DDes 2020 Conference

Date: Wednesday, February 26, 2020
This conference will address new emerging concepts in the field of adaptive and intelligent architecture such as machine learning (ML) and deep learning (DL), Robotic Buildings, Smart Homes in a form of a symposium. Co-sponsored by the Joint Center for Housing Studies.

Rental Housing in the US: Findings from Our New Report

Date: Friday, February 21, 2020
Despite a slowdown in demand, rental markets across the US remain extremely tight, according to our new America’s Rental Housing report. Join us as Whitney Airgood-Obrycki, a Research Associate at the Center and lead author of the report, discusses key findings, including how low vacancy rates, limited new construction, and a growing number of higher-income renters are driving a rental affordability crisis, particularly for middle-income renters.

Boston's Approach to Housing Innovation

Date: Thursday, February 13, 2020
Join the Harvard Kennedy School City + Local Professional Interest Council, in partnership with the Joint Center for Housing Studies and the Rappaport Center for Greater Boston for a conversation with Sheila Dillon and Taylor Cain to discuss how Boston is focusing on housing.

Local Governments and Rental Affordability

Date: Wednesday, February 12, 2020
What can local governments do to address the nation’s ongoing rental affordability crisis? While solutions to the problem ultimately must involve all levels of government, local governments are closest to the problem and, arguably, have many powers to address it.

Building Communities and Reducing Construction Costs: Insights from the Center’s 2019 Gramlich Fellows

Date: Friday, February 7, 2020
Margaret Haltom and Hannah Hoyt will discuss the work they carried out as 2019 Gramlich Fellows in Community and Economic Development. The Gramlich Fellowship in Community and Economic Development gives Harvard graduate students the opportunity to identify, research, publish, and present promising approaches for addressing challenges related to affordable housing and community development

America's Rental Housing 2020

Date: Friday, January 31, 2020
With the number of cost-burdened renters again on the rise, local governments are increasingly on the front lines of a rental affordability crisis. Earlier this year, Minneapolis became the first large American city to end single-family zoning, a bold and decisive move which has the potential to greatly expand the rental supply and improve affordability.